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Mboziswa Mnisi

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mboziswa Mnisi. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Phumplele Village area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Mangangene Dlamini

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: Mangangene Dlamini was a transcriber who worked on the interviews conducted by Philip Bonner in Swaziland in the 1970s.]

Mkhonta Ndwandwe

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mkhonto (Mkhonta) Ndwandwe. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Sigodzi area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Hehhane Ngwenya

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Hehhane Ngwenya. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Mgomfelweni Kraal area of Swaziland in 1970.]

James Nxumalo

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about James Nxumalo. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Elmandle area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Madlopha Shongwe

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Madlopha Shongwe. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Hhohho area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Ngudu Shongwe

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Ngudu Shongwe. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Mngaye area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Sikuleni Shongwe

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mrs. Sikuleni Shongwe. She was interviewed by Philip Bonner in Swaziland in 1970.]

Mboni Soko

  • Persoon
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mboni Soko. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Dwalile area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Sir Henry Edward Bartle Frere

  • Persoon
  • 29 March 1815 - 29 May 1884

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA, 2017, using Wikipedia: Sir Henry Bartle Frere was a British colonial administrator. He was the High Commissioner for Southern Africa, starting in 1877. During his time as the High Commissioner he attempted to merge the states of southern Africa into a British Confederation – this attempt was unsuccessful, led to resistance, and, ultimately, the Zulu and Boer wars. The Zulu War ended in a British victory, but the defeat of British forces at Isandhlwana and the high cost of the war, led to Frere being recalled. Some of the specimens he collected were donated by his sister, Miss Mary Frere. This material was accessioned in 1912.]

Prof. Roderick Urwick Sayce

  • Persoon
  • 1890 - 1970

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA, 2017, using archivewales.org: Professor Roderick Urwick Sayce was a social anthropologist and the editor of Montgomeryshire Collections. He received a Master's in Geography from the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. From 1921 to 1927 he was the head of the Department of Geography and Geology at the University College of Natal in South Africa. He then lectured in Physical Anthropology and Material Culture at Cambridge University and from 1935 to 1957 was Keeper of the Victoria Museum at Manchester University as well as being an Honorary Lecturer in Anthropology. Sayce was editor of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain's Anthropological Journal, 1934-1936. He joined the Powysland Club in 1920 and edited its journal the Montgomeryshire Collections between 1930 and 1966. He was then elected vice-president of the Powysland Club and died in Welshpool in 1970.]

Baron Anatole von Hügel

  • Persoon
  • 1854 - 1928

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using MAA website: Baron Anatole von Hügel was of mixed Austrian aristocratic and Scottish descent, and grew up between Italy, Belgium, and England. His father had a wide-ranging interest in ethnography, zoology, and botany. Von Hügel studied at Stonyhurst, a Catholic College in Lancashire, from 1871-73, but was advised to undertake a long sea voyage for his health, and decided to visit Australia. During his time in Australia, von Hügel mixed in scientific circles, ended up conducting scientific research in Fiji. He returned to England in 1877, where he made contacts in Cambridge. In 1884 he was appointed the first Curator of what was then called the Museum of General and Local Archaeology at the University of Cambridge, a position he would hold for the next thirty-eight years. During his time as Curator, he donated his own materials from his time in Fiji, he raised money to construct the new premises of the museum at Downing Street, and oversaw the move to this location. He also corresponded with collectors, travellers, and researchers from around the world, and steadily built up the collections at the Museum. He died in 1928.]

Alice Werner

  • Persoon
  • 26 June 1859 - 9 June 1935

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA , 2017, using Wikipedia: Alice Werner was a writer, poet, and teacher of the ‘Bantu’ language. After visiting Nyasaland in 1893 and Natal in 1894, much of her writings focused on African themes. She was a professor of Swahili and Bantu languages at the School of Oriental and African Studies and the University of London, which she joined in 1917. She retired in 1929. Following this retirement, she was awarded the title of Emeritus Professor from SOAS. In 1931 she was awarded the Silver Medal of the African Society, of which she was Vice-President.] 

Violet Elise Marie Louise Stapleton (Lady Beaumont)

  • Persoon
  • April 1861 - 1949

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA , 2017, using The Complete Peerage by George Edward Cokayne; the St Mary's Slindon website (www.stmarysslindon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Beaumont-Lady-Violet.doc); and the Slindon Village website, 2017: Violet Elise Marie Louise Stapleton (neé Isaacson), also known as Lady Beaumont, was the daughter of MP for Stepney, Frederick Wootton Isaacson, and Elizabeth Isaacson, well-known milliner who operated under the trade-name 'Madame Elise'. Violet Isaacson married Henry Stapleton, Lord Beaumont, in 1888. Lord Beaumont died in 1892. Lady Beaumont then moved to Slindon with her brother, Frederick F. J. Wootton Isaacson, living in Slindon House. In 1917, Slindon House became a Convalescent Hospital, overseen by Lady Beaumont. Post war the house was cleared, and Lady Beaumont and Wootton Isaacson were able to resume normal life. Lady Beaumont donated material collected by her brother to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. This material was accessioned in 1948.]

Frederick F. J. Wootton Isaacson

  • Persoon
  • 3 January 1858 - 3 February 1948

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using The Complete Peerage by George Edward Cokayne; the St Mary's Slindon website (www.stmarysslindon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Beaumont-Lady-Violet.doc); and the Slindon Village website, 2017: Frederick F. J. Wootton Isaacson was the son of MP for Stepney, Frederick Wootton Isaacson, and Elizabeth Isaacson, well-known milliner who operated under the trade-name 'Madame Elise', and the brother of Lady Violet Beaumont. Frederick F. J. Wootton Isaacson lived in Slindon with his sister, living in Slindon House as Lord of the Manor. In 1917, Slindon House became a Convalescent Hospital, overseen by Lady Beaumont. Post war the house was cleared, and Lady Beaumont and Wootton Isaacson were able to resume normal life. Lady Beaumont donated material collected by her brother to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. This material was accessioned in 1948.]

William Wood

  • Persoon
  • 1824 - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using an extract from Dictionary South African Biography Vol 5: William Wood was a Zulu interpreter, ivory trader and hunter, born in the Cape Colony in 1824. In 1836 he began to attend the Rev. G. Champion's school at the Umlazi mission. He worked as an interpreter for the Reverend F. Owen at uMgungundlovu where he witnessed the murder of Piet Retief.]

R. J. van Reenen

  • Persoon
  • Unknown

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about R. J. van Reenen. He may have worked with the National Monuments Council in South Africa in the 1920s.]

W. C. Holden

  • Persoon
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using Tim Keegan's "Colonial South Africa:Origins Racial Order" : Reverend William C. Holden was a Methodist who arrived in Port Natal in 1847 to serve as a 'settler scribe' to J. C. Chase. He published "The History of the Colony of Natal" in 1855.]

Owen Coetzer

  • Persoon
  • 1938 - 2003

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using www.iol.co.za: Owen Coetzee was a South African journalist and author. He worked for several newspapers in South Africa and wrote three books, the best known of which was an account of the burning of Boer farms during the Anglo-Boer War, "Fire In The Sky". After starting his career as a journalist in the late 1950s at the Diamond Fields Advertiser in Kimberley, Coetzer moved to The Friend in Bloemfontein. He worked at the Daily News in Durban until 1979 when he then moved to Cape Town where he worked for The Argus. Later he worked as the editor of Navy News as well as the editor of Getaway magazine. In Durban, he served as chairman of the Natal Folk Music Association, and in the 1970s started his own music magazine in Durban, Trend.]

Richard Patrick

  • Persoon
  • [195-] - August 2008

Richard Patrick

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