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Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, sound recording

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Digital reproduction of audio extracted from CD1 of the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", originally recorded on wax cylinders and classified by OAW using Mayr's notes as "Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi".]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, sound recording

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Digital reproduction of audio extracted from CD1 of the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", originally recorded on wax cylinders and classified by OAW using Mayr's notes as "IIhubo lempi: war-dance song Three-part singing by Tshingwayo, Nogwaja and Nomhoyi".]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Two-part singing by Tshingwayo and Nomhoyi (men), handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Two-part singing by Tshingwayo and Nomhoyi (men), lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Two-part singing by Tshingwayo and Nomhoyi (men), sound recording

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Digital reproduction of audio extracted from CD1 of the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", originally recorded on wax cylinders and classified by OAW using Mayr's notes as "Ihubo lempi: war-dance song Two-part singing by Tshingwayo and Nomhoyi (men)".]

Ihubo lokuzingela [hunting song] Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

Ihubo lokuzingela [hunting song] Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Ihubo lokuzingela [hunting song] Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, sound recording

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Digital reproduction of audio extracted from CD1 of the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", originally recorded on wax cylinders and classified by OAW using Mayr's notes as "Ihubo lokuzingela [hunting song] Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi".]

Ihubo lomkosi: song of the "great feast" Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

Ihubo lomkosi: song of the "great feast" Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Ihubo lomkosi: song of the "great feast" Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Ihubo lomkosi: song of the "great feast" Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, sound recording

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Digital reproduction of audio extracted from CD1 of the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", originally recorded on wax cylinders and classified by OAW using Mayr's notes as "Ihubo lomkosi: song of the "great feast" Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi".]

Iketo: wedding dance [of the bridegroom's party] Two-part singing by Ts[h]ingwayo and Nomhoyi, handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

Iketo: wedding dance [of the bridegroom's party] Two-part singing by Ts[h]ingwayo and Nomhoyi, lyrics transcript and translation

[Source - Benathi Marufu for FHYA, 2020, using ÖAW materials: Relevant pages of the CD Booklet for the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", published in 2006. To view the full booklet click the link in the Associated materials field below.]

Iketo: wedding dance [of the bridegroom's party] Two-part singing by Ts[h]ingwayo and Nomhoyi, sound recording

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Digital reproduction of audio extracted from CD1 of the "Series 10: The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908", originally recorded on wax cylinders and classified by OAW using Mayr's notes as "Iketo: wedding dance [of the bridegroom's party] Two-part singing by Ts[h]ingwayo and Nomhoyi".]

lgama lokuzingela: hunting dance Two-part singing by Nogwaja and Nomhoyi, handwritten protocol

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton for FHYA, 2019, using ÖAW materials: Mayr’s note-taking was sporadic. In his protocols he occasionally gives very few details about some informants, while with others he is quite meticulous. Usually, informants without a first or family name, or informants with names that sound foreign to us, such as Nogwaja, Pakati, Tshingwayo, and Nondhleko, reveal that the person was not a converted Christian, but still a traditional Zulu in the sense that the person adhered to long-established Zulu custom; European-style names such as Frida Kunene and Maria Gertrud(e) Mkize, on the other hand, indicate that these people were Christians. Baptisms were considered successes in the missionary's attempt to "win souls" for the church priorities for the mission. Thus, the baptism registers give some details about those who had decided to change their religion. Typically, when a person was baptised, he or she would take a European name. These names were usually those of European patrons: for example, Fr. Mayr baptised the five-week-old Msomi, Maria Coudenhove, which was the name of the newborn girl's European sponsor. Mlambo, a young man, received the name of his "uncle" or European patron, Franz Rohrmoser (cf. Gütl 2004: 77, 89, 128). The age of the people to be baptised varied from newborn children to elderly people; since most of the latter did not know their birthdays, Mayr was only able to take down estimates of their age into his register (cf. Gütl 2004: 99-100).]

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