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Archival Descriptions
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge (MAA) Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge (MAA) Series
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FHYA selection from the Baldry Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: No biographical information for H. Baldry is available. Material collected by H. Baldry was accessioned into the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge in 1927. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Bulwer Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using Wikipedia, 2017: Sir Henry Ernest Gascoyne Bulwer, the nephew of Sir Henry Lytton Bulwer, was a British colonial administrator and diplomat. He was the Lieutenant Governor of the Colony of Natal from 1875-1880, and the Governor of the Colony of Natal and Special Commissioner for ‘Zulu Affairs’ from 1882-1885. His complete collection in Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge comprises of c.154 objects classified by MAA as being of ‘Zulu’ and ‘Matebele’ manufacture. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Feilden Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA using the obituary of Henry Wemyss Feilden published in (1921), Obituary. Ibis, 63: 726–732. doi:10.1111/j.1474-919X.1921.tb01297.x, 2017: Colonel Henry Wemyss Feilden was born in 1838, and was the second son of Sir William Feilden. He served in the army in South Africa during the Boer Campaign of 1881 and the Boer War of 1890, where he worked as the Paymaster of Imperial Yeomanry. The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge acquired some ethnographic material from Foster. This material was accessioned in the late 1800s. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Foster Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using The London Gazette (published Oct 2, 1900), 2017: Captain J.E. Forster (also written as Foster) was a member of the 3rd Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment who was seconded for service with Line Battalion in South Africa on the 3rd of October 1900. The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge acquired some ethnographic material from Foster. This material was accessioned in 1900. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Frere Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using Wikipedia, 2017: Sir Henry Bartle Frere was the British High Commissioner for Southern Africa from 1877 to 1880. During his time as High Commissioner he attempted to merge the states of southern Africa into a British Confederation – this attempt was unsuccessful, and led to resistance, and, ultimately, the Anglo-Zulu and Anglo-Boer wars. Some of the specimens he collected were donated by his sister, Mary Frere, in 1912.]

FHYA selection from the Haddon, A. C. Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA using the Cambridge University Library website, 2017: Alfred Cort Haddon was a zoologist, ethnologist, and anthropologist in the late 1800s and early 1900s. He was a lecturer at the University of Cambridge and was a Fellow of Christ’s Church. His papers, and their associated materials, were deposited at the Cambridge University Library by the Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology in 1968. The FHYA selection of Haddon items consist of material collected by Haddon in the Natal leg of the 1905 visit of the British Association to South Africa. During the course of this trip, Haddon collected items which are currently held in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge.]

FHYA selection from the Haddon, E. B. Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using MAA materials, 2017: Ernest Balfour Haddon was the son of Alfred Cort Haddon. He was Assistant District Commissioner in Gondokoro in the southern Sudan, then worked in Uganda. During WWI he was an Honourable Captain in the Uganda Carrier Corps. He worked as the Postal Censor in Uganda from 1935-1945. Some of the items of anthropological importance collected by E.B. Haddon are housed in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Haynes Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA using thewardrobe.org website and material provided by Nessa Leibhammer, 2017: There is no biographical information for C. B. H Haynes, but he may have been a part of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment in South Africa during the Boer War. B. Haynes donated material collected by C.B.H. Haynes to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge on behalf of the Haynes family. This material was accessioned by MAA in 1977. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Murray Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA using the Obituary Notice for Murray written in the Journal of General Microbiology, 1967 Vol. 46, and the McGill University Department of Microbiology and Immunology website, 2017: Dr. Everitt G.D. Murray became the first chairman of the Department of Bacteriology at McGill University in 1931. In addition to his various academic posts, Murray actively served McGill’s teaching hospitals. Until 1955 he was Bacteriologist-in-Chief of the Royal Victoria Hospital. Murray collected ethnographic and biological material from southern Africa, some of which is housed in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Ridgeway Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using MAA materials, 2016: Sir William Ridgeway was the Chairman of the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge, and the Disney Professor of Archaeology. He first appears in the MAA records in 1896 when he became a member of The Antiquarian Committee and donated several archaeological artefacts to the collection, AR 1896.75-88. He remained an avid collector, with a particular interest in currency, but contributed to collections from many regions of the world. He died in 1926 and bequeathed his archaeological and ethnographic collections to MAA. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Sayce Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using archivewales.org, 2017: Professor Roderick Urwick Sayce was a social anthropologist and the editor of Montgomeryshire Collections. He received a Master’s in Geography from the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. From 1921 to 1927 he was the head of the Department of Geography and Geology at the University College of Natal in South Africa. He then lectured in Physical Anthropology and Material Culture at Cambridge University and from 1935 to 1957 was Keeper of the Victoria Museum at Manchester University as well as being an Honorary Lecturer in Anthropology. Sayce was editor of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain’s Anthropological Journal, 1934-1936. The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge acquired some ethnographic material from Sayce. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Unknown Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: Ethnographic and archaeological material from unknown collectors is housed at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Von Hügel Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA using MAA website, 2017: Baron Anatole von Hügel was appointed the first Curator of what was then called the Museum of General and Local Archaeology at the University of Cambridge in 1884, a position he would hold for the next thirty-eight years. During his time as Curator, he donated his own materials from his time in Fiji, he raised money to construct the new premises of the museum at Downing Street and oversaw the move to this location. He also corresponded with collectors, travellers, and researchers from around the world, and steadily built up the collections at the Museum. He died in 1928. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Werner Series

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA using Wikipedia, 2017: Alice Werner was a writer, poet, and teacher of the ‘Bantu’ language. After visiting Nyasaland in 1893 and Natal in 1894, much of her writings focused on African themes. She was a professor of Swahili and Bantu languages at the School of Oriental and African Studies and the University of London. The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge acquired some ethnographic material from Werner. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]

FHYA selection from the Wootton-Isaacson and Beaumont Series

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA using The Complete Peerage by George Edward Cokayne; the St Mary’s Slindon website (www.stmarysslindon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Beaumont-Lady-Violet.doc); and the Slindon Village website, 2017: Frederick F. J. Wootton Isaacson was the son of MP for Stepney, Frederick Wootton Isaacson, and Elizabeth Isaacson, well-known milliner who operated under the trade-name ‘Madame Elise’, and the brother of Lady Violet Beaumont. Frederick F. J. Wootton Isaacson lived in Slindon with his sister, living in Slindon House as Lord of the Manor. In 1917, Slindon House became a Convalescent Hospital, overseen by Lady Beaumont. Post war the house was cleared, and Lady Beaumont and Wootton Isaacson were able to resume normal life. Lady Beaumont donated material collected by her brother to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. This material was accessioned in 1948. The FHYA selection of this material consists of objects from the FHYA target area of KwaZulu-Natal and immediately adjacent regions.]